Blackshirt newspaper coverage of the Mile End Pogrom. Source: Wiki Commons

Mile End Pogrom: the violent aftermath of the Battle of Cable Street

The Battle of Cable Street is remembered still to this day as a striking mobilisation against the rise of fascism in the years leading up to World War II; a turbulent day in which barricades were raised, bottles and bricks were thrown, and the fascists were defeated.

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Pearly Kings and Queens of Blackheath and Grove Park

The real history of the Pearly Kings and Queens

The Pearly Kings and Queens are a famous symbol of cockney culture and the second oldest charity in London, but what’s the real story behind the Pearl monarchy? How are they still spreading the original Pearly message? And how much do the suits really weigh?

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Mile End Old Town sign on Roman Road

Where do we live? A guide to neighbourhood boundaries and nomenclature

The labels of our local neighbourhoods evolved from an amalgamation of ancient geographic features, thousand-year old parishes, and newer council administrations, meaning that the boundaries and nomenclatures of these areas have continuously shifted over time.

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Statue of Sir John Cass, Jewry Street, Aldgate

William Gladstone and Sir John Cass: statues with links to slavery

His blood red hands have been a symbol for the oppression of the working class for as long as local people can remember. And the statue itself represents a man who is under scrutiny by activists and local government for his record upholding the slave trade. Should the statue’s removal be the symbolic next step in the fight against oppression in all forms?

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Etching of Daniel Mendoza

“Mendoza the Jew”: the boxing pioneer who fought antisemitism one jab at a time

Inside the ring, his innovative techniques raised the sport from primitive punch-throwing to a strategic artform, while outside it, his visibility offered a rare account of positive representation of Jewishness. Empowered by his example, boxing became popular among the Jewish youth, making it harder to stereotype them as defenceless and weak.

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